Poetry

LET’S TALK ABOUT IT By Yung Kaygee

Written by Editor

Let’s talk about it 

Let’s talk about the ungodly mutilation of the girl child, which kills her pleasure for se at womanhood.

Let’s talk about it 

Let’s talk about Zainab, Fatima and Bilkisu, who were forced into early marriages, so the last we heard of them was the cases of VVF [  ] 

Let’s talk about it

Let’s talk about Nneka, Chioma and Nkiruka, who grew old at home because the pride price placed on them is too high.

Let’s talk about it

Let’s talk about Ubong, Ene and Ekiate, who are relegated and regarded as sex goddesses. Disgusting folks.

Let’s talk about

Let’s talk about Vou, Kaneng and Simi, the major victims, who were rendered homeless and helpless after the terrorists attacked.

Let’s talk about it 

Let’s talk about Nene, the young girl who was raped, denied justice and even stigmatized, under the disguise that she was not modestly dressed before the guys. Disgusting philosophy.

Let’s talk about it

Let’s talk about the woman folk, who is relegated to the background, whose back is pressed to the ground and cautioned to be seen and not heard.

Let’s talk about it 

Let’s talk about the young, innocent and defenseless school girls who were abducted into captivity, with little or no effort to return them to their community and family

Let’s talk about it

Let’s talk about that woman whose hair was shaved, dressed in black, forced to drink the dirty water used to bath the dead and subjected to untold hardship and pains all in the name of mourning her husband.  

Let’s talk about it

Let’s talk about teenage girl who is sent to sell oranges rather than being sent to school.

Let’s talk about it

Let’s talk about the jewel in the sun, the treasure buried underneath the grounds of a covered and battered body figure, the one who wears fake smiles to cover her frown, the queen who is neither treated like one, nor allowed to wear crown, the one who is respected and admired sometimes only because of the pretty face, Coca-Cola shaped body figure, narrow path in-between her legs, pumpy chest, hot looking legs, and not her potentials and pride as a woman.

Let’s talk about it

Let’s talk about that strong figure in the society who is called a weaker vessel, yet she carries for nine months what the man spends few minutes to put into her, afterwards look tied and exhausted. 

Nonsense. 

Passes through a half death situation to bring to life that which the man will later call my effort and property.

Senseless.

Let’s talk about it

Let’s talk about Aisha, whom baba said was meant for the kitchen and the other room.

Let’s talk about it

Let’s talk about the young wife who is bruised and battered, beaten and thrown to the floor, like a used and useless bunch of broom.

Let’s talk about 

Let’s talk about you, who might choose to bottle up your pains, consider talking and sharing as shame, veil your scars, make up fake smiles, bandage your wounds, carry your burdens alone and pretend like all is well.   

Let’s talk about

Let’s talk about those issues that glares and glitters before our very eyes, YET we choose not to see or notice them.

For I have spoken.

Cos you can kill a prophet—not his prophesy

You can destroy a king—not his kingdom

You can ruin a messenger— not his message

So, you can ignore a poet— not his poetry

About the author

Editor

Bada Yusuf Amoo holds B.A in Literature in English from Obafemi Awolowo University, he is the publisher of thespeakingheart.com. He started the website in 2015, he has published both his works and other budding writers and poets on the website. He is a public commentators and his articles are on different websites.